Photo of powered wheelchair with tilting seat, `March of dimes Canada', Megan, "New Community Blog Post!"

Let’s Talk About: Megan!

Photo of powered wheelchair with tilting seat, `March of dimes Canada', Megan, "New Community Blog Post!"

Megan was only 20-years-old when she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Over time, the disease has progressed to the point that she has limited circulation in her legs causing severe swelling and she can no longer walk. Megan’s occupational therapist recommended a power wheelchair with a tilted seat to give her mobility and relieve the pressure on her legs. But at a total cost of $18,730, the chair was out of reach for her financially. After receiving funding from the Ministry of Health’s Assistive Devices Program and the MS Society, Megan applied to March of Dimes Canada’s Assistive Devices Program for the remaining $2,700.

March of Dimes Canada was able to fund the remaining amount to help Megan purchase the wheelchair, and she is amazed at the difference it has made. Megan has become more mobile and much more comfortable.

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Sraddha, Ryan, Jessica and Evan demonstrating tilting wheelchairs

It’s a godsend,” says Megan of her chair. “It’s very helpful. For years I’ve had massive swelling in my legs and since I’ve gotten my chair I now have knee caps and shape to my legs… I feel very blessed to have been able to access this resource.”

Megan is very grateful to all the generous donors who contributed to her power wheelchair.

Thanks to your support over the last year, we have been able to provide 282 assistive devices to 119 consumers just in the Ottawa region alone! We were able to turn every dollar donated into $5.44 worth of equipment – purchasing in total $204,231 worth of assistive devices.

You are making a difference in your community!

You can now be part of our Door-to-door campaign without having to leave the couch! Sign up as an online canvasser and use the power of the Internet to help raise money to support Canadians with disabilities: http://bit.ly/D2DOnline

 

Eva M. received much needed support from MODC's Assistive Devices Program!

Let’s Talk About: Eva M.!

Eva M. received much needed support from MODC's Assistive Devices Program!

Eva is a 61 year old female living in a retrofitted apartment in Barrie, Ontario. She has multiple sclerosis, which limits her mobility to using a power wheelchair to get around and make herself comfortable. Her previous chair was 4 years old and broken beyond repair.

Eva’s occupational therapist (OT) helped her apply to the Ministry of Health’s Assistive Devices Program, which approved 75% funding for a new power wheelchair that cost $5,427.60. This left Eva with 25% to cover. Her finances were very limited, so she knew she wouldn’t be able to afford this necessary piece of equipment. Her occupational therapist helped her apply to the Independent Living Services of Simcoe County & Area, the MS Society, and March of Dimes Canada’s Assistive Devices Program.

The Assistive Devices Program (ADP) http://bit.ly/ModcADP helps people with disabilities across the province to pay for the cost and maintenance of basic mobility devices, as well as home and bath safety equipment. ADP is one of March of Dimes Canada’s charitable programs that is supported entirely by donor dollars (including via the Door to Door campaign). Many of the people who benefit from ADP live on an income of less than $15,000.00 per year, meaning that assistive devices are often financially out of reach. At ADP, every dollar is stretched to its fullest potential so staff can provide necessary, life-changing devices to Ontarians who desperately need – but can’t afford – them.

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Eva’s November 2015 application was denied, so she continued her fundraising efforts. In January 2016 –with some funding through the MS Society behind her – March of Dimes Canada’s Assistive Devices Program was able to help out. The result: a fully funded new power wheelchair.

The power wheelchair has been ordered and Eva is very excited because her current wheelchair is unsafe – pieces are falling off and the foot component is dragging. She says that, if she has to take it out, she has difficulty negotiating ramps and is very nervous. Eva knows the new wheelchair will make her feel more secure and confident.

“This wheelchair will keep me independent and out of long-term care and just having it lifts my spirits.”

Eva is very grateful to March of Dimes Canada’s Assistive Devices Program for the support, and March of Dimes Canada is equally grateful to the donors who make it possible for us to help people in the Barrie area. Eva now has peace of mind and a safe way to get around in her apartment and her community.

ADP as mentioned, is also partly funded by our Door-to-Door Program, which runs from November to late March. If you’re interested in volunteering as a canvasser for this year or the following, please email us at info@marchofdimes.ca with “Door-2-Door Volunteer” in the subject header! You can also become an online canvasser at www.mymod.ca/doortodoor

Megan’s Story

Door-To-Door-Tilted-Wheelchairs

Megan was only 20-years-old when she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Over time, the disease has progressed to the point that she has limited circulation in her legs causing severe swelling and she can no longer walk. Megan’s occupational therapist recommended a power wheelchair with a tilted seat to give her mobility and relieve the pressure on her legs. But at a total cost of $18,730, the chair was out of reach for her financially. After receiving funding from the Ministry of Health’s Assistive Devices Program and the MS Society, Megan applied to March of Dimes Canada’s Assistive Devices Program for the remaining $2,700.

March of Dimes Canada was able to fund the remaining amount to help Megan purchase the wheelchair, and she is amazed at the difference it has made. Megan has become more mobile and much more comfortable.

It’s a godsend,” says Megan of her chair. “It’s very helpful. For years I’ve had massive swelling in my legs and since I’ve gotten my chair I now have knee caps and shape to my legs… I feel very blessed to have been able to access this resource.”

Megan is very grateful to all the generous donors who contributed to her power wheelchair.

Thanks to your support over the last year, we have been able to provide 282 assistive devices to 119 consumers just in the Ottawa region alone! We were able to turn every dollar donated into $5.44 worth of equipment – purchasing in total $204,231 worth of assistive devices.

You are making a difference in your community!

You can now be part of our Door-to-door campaign without having to leave the couch! Sign up as an online canvasser and use the power of the Internet to help raise money to support Canadians with #disabilities: http://bit.ly/D2DOnline

 

 

Assistive Devices Program (ADP)

Barbara is a 73-year-old Kingston, ON resident who lives with osteoarthritis. Her condition results in poor balance and makes walking difficult. For over eighteen years, Barbara has been using a walker to help keep her mobile. Over time, the walker began to break down. However, she needed this equipment, so Barbara continued to use it, even without brakes. The condition of her walker was so poor that she could not even venture into the hall of her apartment building safely. Barbara said that “my old walker made me feel nervous when I was moving around.” Barbara’s occupational therapist began to worry about her safety and urged her to buy a new walker, but her limited income made this a difficult task. Barbara, in need of help, turned to March of Dimes’ Assistive Devices Program.

The Assistive Devices Program (ADP) provides financial assistance to people with disabilities across the province, assisting with the cost and maintenance of basic mobility devices as well as home and bath safety equipment. ADP is one of March of Dimes’ charitable programs supported 100% by donor dollars. Many of the people served live on an income of less than $15,000 per year, meaning that many assistive devices are financially out of reach. At ADP, the program is able to stretch every dollar to its fullest potential enabling staff to provide necessary, life-changing devices to people across the province that so desperately need them – and cannot afford the equipment on their own.

United Way donates a portion of its funds to the ADP program in Kingston and focuses on promoting Healthy People, Strong Communities. Without United Way, March of Dimes would be unable to continue helping people like Barbara. Without this partnership, the expense of a new walker, which exceeded $500, would have prevented Barbara from the peace of mind she now enjoys.

walker1

Barbara is happy to have her new, safe walker. Although she uses it primarily for indoor use, Barbara prefers using her walker over her wheelchair so that she can maintain and build strength in her legs. Without the funding she received from March of Dimes, Barbara said she “would have had to keep her old walker and she would have had to use her wheelchair more often.”  The new walker is large and comfortable enough to allow Barbara to sit on it when she needs to, which allows her to use it over her wheelchair. Barbara is very thankful for the help she received from March of Dimes.